Judges play a critical role in ensuring that terrorists are brought to justice. To discuss the perspectives of the judiciary in countering terrorism, the Global Center hosted a lunchtime event featuring two former Supreme Court justices, the Honorable Eliezer Rivlin, President of the International Organization for Judicial Training and a former judge Supreme Court Justice of Israel and Mr. Jean-Paul Laborde, Executive Director of the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED) and former Judge of the Cour de Cassation of France. The panelists discussed the significant implications of the judiciary’s capacity to adjudicate terrorism cases in order to not only prevent terrorism and bring terrorists to justice, but to safeguard the rule of law and protect human rights. The particular security challenges faced by judges as primary targets of terrorist attacks and the importance of judicial independence and ethics were emphasized.

This panel discussion builds on the Global Center’s ongoing work with judges around the globe and in particular, the South Asia regional process conducted in partnership with the Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate. This regional process brings together twice annually judges, prosecutors and police officers from all eight SAARC member states. The judges’ project endeavors to strengthen the judiciary by compiling and developing strategies for the improved adjudication of complex criminal and terrorism cases, particularly those with a transnational element. The Global Center and CTED are working with participating judges to draft a regional toolkit to support the development of national bench books. The drafting process further supports the broader regional goals of promoting cooperation and enhancing regional capacity.

To learn more about our work on these issues, please contact Melissa Lefas, Legal Programs Adviser at mlefas@globalcenter.org.

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